The Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust
Historic Environment Record
 

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Coed y Cwm

Primary Reference Number (PRN) : 00369s
Trust : Glamorgan Gwent
Site Type : Long barrow
Period : Neolithic
Community : St Nicholas and Bonvilston
NGR : ST0810873779
Legal Protection : scheduled ancient monument

Summary :
A possible collapsed or unfinished burial chamber, comprising three large slabs of highly weathered tabular limestone. The largest slab is c 3m long and a maximum of 1m thick, being markedly thinner (0.4m - 0.9m) at its S end. It lies slightly tilted tow

Description :
A possible collapsed or unfinished burial chamber, comprising three large slabs of highly weathered tabular limestone. The largest slab is c 3m long and a maximum of 1m thick, being markedly thinner (0.4m - 0.9m) at its S end. It lies slightly tilted towards the SW. On its NE side it is propped up by numerous small stones underneath. The two smaller slabs are positioned immediately to the S and are c 1m across and 0.25m thick. The stones are situated on a low ridge, but there is no indication of any mound. It is unclear whether this is a genuine prehistoric monument or a natural feature. These stones may indeed be the last remains of a now denuded long barrow, but excavation in 1936 showed the slabs to rest on a natural gravel formation in which no trace of sockets could be found, which might argue against it having been a built structure (Daniel 1937). However, a polished flint axe was found beneath the surface about 0.5m E of the stones, indicating that at the very least they were the focus of some prehistoric activity.
Reference: Daniel, GE, 1937, '##', Archaeologia Cambrensis #, 287-93
Dimensions: See descriptive text
(1967/1976) Burial Chamber, Coed-y-cwm, at about 100m above OD on a low ridge overlooking a tributary stream of the R Waycock on the S. Four slabs of tabular limestone lie on the ridge in a position not accepted as natural when it was suggested in 1935 that they could represent a ruined or unfinished cromlech, sited at the E end of a much denuded long barrow. The largest slab is 3.0m long E-W by 1.4m by 0.5m thick, but the others are barely one quarter as large in area and half as thick. Excavation in 1936 showed them to lie on a natural gravel formation in which no trace of sockets can be found. A polished flint axe was found beneath the surface about half a metre E of the stones. The ridge was interpreted as natural in a cutting 6m W of the stones, but this may have been the unweathered surface beneath a vestigial long mound which was formerly detectable by levelling; furthermore, the stones are unlikely to have reached their present position through natural agency.

(1982) These carboniferous limestone boulders are weathered over their upper surfaces to a depth of circa 0.13m, suggesting many thousands of years of weathering in situ and, together with the now slight, ploughed down mound upon which they rest, are most probably a natural formation. Bedrock of the same stone is very close to the surface hereabouts.

(1986) The cairn stands in a grass field, grazed by cows, on a low ridge, with a small valley to the NE. The remains consist of one large and teo smaller stones to the south of the larger one. This is a large pitted stone, c.2.7m x 1m (max) lying slightly titled towards the south west. It is 0.4m - 0.9m thick being thinnest at the southern end. On its north eastern side it is propped up by some small stones underneath it. One at the southern end is larger than the rest. The two smaller stones just south of the larger one are of the same pitted srone and are c.1m across and 0.4m and 0.25m thick. There is no sign of a mound.
GGAT 72 Prehistoric Funerary and Ritual Sites Project 2003

Sources :
Ferrell, G. , 1989 , Archaeology in and Around the Bonvilston and St Nicholas Area
08/Pm Desc Text/Archaeology in and Around the Bonvilston and St Nicholas Area/Acess Archaeology/1989/SMR Report Archive
Pm desc text/Evans EM/2003/GGAT 72 Prehistoric Funerary and Ritual Sites Project
02/PM Excav Rep//Daniel GE/1937/Archaeol Cambrensis/pp287-93;
01/MM Record/OS//1970/ST 07 SE/;
03/PM List//RCAHM/1976/Glamorgan Invent/p40 No45;
05/PH Desc Text///1874/Trans Cardiff Natur Soc/Vol6 pp73-8;
06/MM Record Card/OS//8.4.82/ST 07 SE 12/;
04/PM Desc Text///1849/Archaeol Cambrensis/Vol4 No16 pp327-8;
07/MM Desc Text/CADW/Whittle E/1986/AM107/
010/Desc Text/Cadw/ Full Management Report/2006/ Copy in further information file

Events :
E000738 : COED Y CWM, PARTIAL EXCAVATION, 1936 (year : 1936)
E001481 : Archaeological Assessment of Bonvilston and St Nicholas (year : 1989)

Related PRNs :


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