The Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust
Historic Environment Record
 

The following information has been provided under the terms and conditions of access as detailed on GGAT’s website www.ggat.org.uk.  Copyright is reserved on all data supplied by the GGAT HER Charitable Trust. All output resulting from the use of the data must acknowledge the source as follows:-
Derived from information held by the GGAT HER Charitable Trust copyright.

The data below is intended to be used for information and research only and is not for use as part of a commercial project.  If you wish to use information derived from material held by the GGAT HER Charitable Trust for publication in printed or multimedia form or to compile resources for commercial use, prior permission must be obtained in writing. For further information or to arrange a visit to the Trust please send an enquiry form http://www.ggat.org.uk/her/english/enquiry_form.html to her@ggat.org.uk.

HAROLD'S STONES

Primary Reference Number (PRN) : 00854g
Trust : Glamorgan Gwent
Community : Trellech United
NGR : SO49930514
Site Type (preferred type first) : Prehistoric cup marked stone / Bronze Age Standing stone
Legal Protection : scheduled ancient monument

Summary :
The stone row was described by OS workers in 1956 as the remnants of a possible cromlech or stone circle standing some distance around a large sepulchral mound. The stone row is comprised of three upright menhirs that are situated within a pasture field at the S end of the village of Trellech. The central stone bears cup-marks.

Description :
Large cupmarks are visible on the smoothed south-west face of the middle stone of Harold's Stones (Peterson and Pollard 2004, 76).

The stone row was described by OS workers in 1956 as the remnants of a possible cromlech or stone circle standing some distance around a large sepulchral mound. The stone row is comprised of three upright menhirs that are situated within a pasture field at the S end of the village of Trellech adjacent to the B4293. The stones are a conglomerate, sometimes called pudding stone, aligned NEE-SWW and decline in individual height from the largest in the W to the smallest in the E. The stone row is edged by two raised linear banks aligned N-S and E-W, the latter having been an old and now extinct field boundary by the appearance of many mature hedgerow trees growing upon it. The most W stone is the largest; it is rectangular at its base and tapers to a point at its top. The stone leans to the SE and has dimensions of (base) 1.3m x 0.8m (height) 3.8m. The centre stone is slightly smaller and is cylindrical in form at the base and tapers in to its top. The stone leans to the NW and has dimensions of (base) 0.9m x 0.7m (height) 3m. The E stone is the smallest and is rectangular at its base and tapers to its top. It leans slightly to the W and has dimensions of (base) 1.1m x 0.45m (height) 2.5m.
Dimensions: see descriptive text
(1889) The three standing stones now remaining at Trelleck probably formed part of a large circle which stood at some little distance around a sepulchral mound. (Source 01/)

(1958) The stones are in a pasture field and are in no danger of damage. They are of conglomerate. The SW stone is of rectangular section measuring 1.1m by 0.7m at the base and tapering towards the top. It leans to the SE. The centre stone measures 0.8m by 0.7 at the base and tapers slightly. The NE stone measures 0.4m by 0.8m in section and tapers to 0.3m by 0.5m at the top. (Source 01)

(1987) The stones stand in a permanent pasture field, grazed by cows and sheep. It lies just to the S of Trellech next to the B4293 road. By the entrance to the field, which is off the road, Trellech school has erected a plaque with information about the stones (put up in 1986). There are 3 stones in a NE-SW alignment. The total distance between them is 14m. They are made of conglmerate stone called pudding stone. The stone at the NE end is 2.2m high, 1m wide and 0.4m thick. It leans slightly towards the N. The middle stone is 2.5m high, 0.7m wide and 0.7m thick, and leans slightly towards the W. The stone at the SW end is the largest, being 3m high, 1m wide at the base, tapering to 0.4m at the top, and 0.7m wide. It leans considerably towards the SE. (Source 04)
GGAT 72 Prehistoric Funerary and Ritual Sites Project 2003

Sources :
Peterson, R and Pollard, J , 2004 , The Neolithic: The first farming societies
01/MM Record Card/OS/1956/SO 40 NE 7
02/PM List/Cadw/Scheduled Ancient Monuments Record Form
01/PM Note/1973/Parkes LN/Arch in Wales p53 no76
04/PM Desc Text/AM107/Whittle E/1987/
Pm desc text/Evans EM/2003/GGAT 72 Prehistoric Funerary and Ritual Sites Project
02/PM Note/1973/Parkes LN/Arch in Wales p53 no76
03/PM List/Cadw/Scheduled Ancient Monuments Record Form
08Desc Text/Cadw/Full Management Report/2007/Copy in further information file.

Events :

Related PRNs :


October 22, 2014, 12:16 pm - HTML file produced from GGAT HER Charitable Trust Ltd. Heathfield House, Heathfield, Swansea SA1 Tel. 01792 655208; Fax 01792 474469 website: www.ggat.org.uk  email: her@ggat.org.uk Registered Charity no. 505609
Data supplied by in partnership with Local Authorities, Cadw and the partners of ENDEX © GGAT HER Charitable Trust, 2014 (and in part © Crown, 2014).