The Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust
Historic Environment Record
 

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YNYS FAWR CORN DRYING KILN

Primary Reference Number (PRN) : 04787w
Trust : Glamorgan Gwent
Site Type : Corn drying kiln
Period : Post-Medieval
Community : Glyncorrwg
NGR : SS809948
Legal Protection : scheduled ancient monument

Summary :
A well preserved example of a field corn-drying kiln, probably associated with a nearby farmstead of the same name. Such structures are believed to have been in use from the 14th century onwards to the early 19th century.

Description :
A well preserved example of a field corn-drying kiln. Such structures were once common in Wales, but few now survive. This example is almost complete. It is a dry-stone walled pit in the form of an inverted cone 2m in depth stadning on a low mound on the hillside. The pit is roughly 3m in diamete at the top, tapering to 1m at the base. There is a neatly constructed lip in masonry around the top of the pit. A tunnel about 4m long connects the bottom of the pit with the edge of the mound on the downhill side. A cloth or skin was stretched across the top, probably from a wooden frame set within the lip, and fire was lighted in the end of the tunnel. Grain was spread across the membrane t dry before being stored. Such structures are believed to have been in use from the 14th century onwards to the early 19th century. The scheduled area is a square following the line of a stock fence tjhat has been erected around the mound. Of national importance as an outstandingly preserved example of this important agricultural practice. Probably associated with a nearby farmstead of the same name (although Cadw have scheduled it under the name 'Cynon').

Sources :
01/Desc Text/Cadw/ Full Management Report/2006/ Copy in further information file

Events :

Related PRNs : 4021w


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